Which NCL mine produces the most coal?

Study unit: Soil pollution and raw material extraction in the Ruhr area

Change of soils through anthropogenic influences pp 263-365 | Cite as

  • Detlef Briesen
  • Dieter A. Hiller

Summary

The pollution of the soil by the mining and processing of raw materials as well as measures to reduce, eliminate or even avoid this pollution are topics of inexhaustible breadth. Just think of the variety of raw materials that we extract from the earth: of metals, gravel, sand and stone, of peat, coal and crude oil, of the salts. One should also visualize the different processes involved in the extraction of raw materials and their further processing up to the finished product; because it is not only the direct intervention through the mining and soil sealing that damages the soil, the extraction methods also play their part. In addition, there are the traffic routes and means of transporting raw materials, products and building materials, the industrial plants and the human settlements that arise in the vicinity of the mining and processing sites. In addition, the energy required for operation must be ensured - in earlier times this was in addition to human and animal muscle power as well as water power v. a. Charcoal - later, at the time of the industrial revolution, coal and coke. The extraction of charcoal and coal always brings considerable environmental, especially soil pollution with it.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Detlef Briesen
  • Dieter A. Hiller
  1. 1. Institute for European Regional Research (IFER) University / Comprehensive University of Siegen, Germany
  2. 2. Department of Architecture, Bio- and Geosciences University / Comprehensive University of Essen, Germany