What are the dietary rules for Lent

Faith Practice

In Islam

From an Islamic point of view, food is not only something that people eat in order to keep themselves alive, but it also has a spiritual meaning: "Tell me what you eat and I will tell you who you are!"

In Islam there is a clear ban on pork, which not only includes meat and sausage products, but also all products that are made from these substances, such as pork gelatine (which is particularly important for sweets and yoghurt products).

Depending on their religious orientation, some Muslims do not eat meat that has not been slaughtered according to a certain rite. This meat is not consideredhalal (allowed).

So-called "Halal stamps" exist for orientation. Like the stamp of the veterinary office, they can be found on the meat or on the packaging. Among Muslims, however, special companies are also considered reliable in that they only process halal meat. In some places, decisions are therefore made according to the company label.

Most Muslims also regard the consumption of blood as forbidden, be it in sausage products or with meat that is not cooked through. Some Muslim groups also do not consider certain shellfish from the sea, such as shrimp, lobster or lobster, to be allowed.

Kosher foods, that is, foods that conform to Jewish dietary laws, always comply with Muslim dietary regulations.