What are the contributions of Alan Turing

Alan Turing - The tragic story of genius

Lecture
Events
Wed October 24, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Basel

Alan Mathison Turing is one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century. He invented the computer as a model of thought even before such machines actually existed. He helped to crack the German Enigma cipher machine and thus to shorten the Second World War. Turing, who died under tragic circumstances, would have turned 100 this year. A lecture with the renowned Turing researcher Jack Copeland from New Zealand.

The British mathematician and logician Alan Turing made important contributions to the development of the computer, but also to research into artificial intelligence and to questions of logic and number theory. He is considered one of the fathers of the computer and in his 1936 essay “On Computable Numbers” described a theoretical machine that can be programmed to calculate numbers. During the Second World War, Turing was involved as a mathematician in the secret Operation Ultra and helped to crack the riddle of the German Enigma encryption machine. As a homosexual he was persecuted after the war and only driven to his death at the age of 43.

The philosopher Jack Copeland, born in 1950, is one of the most renowned Turing researchers in the world and has written various publications and books on the subject. He is Director of the Turing Archives of Computer History and Professor of Philosophy at the University of Canterburry in Christchurch, New Zealand. Jack Copeland travels to Switzerland to take part in an interdisciplinary conference on Alan Turing at ETH Zurich. In the run-up to this conference, he will give an exclusive lecture in Basel. Jack Copeland talks about the legacy that the versatile mathematician leaves behind. The presentation is in English.

Events
Wed October 24, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Basel